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Monitoring the Streaming Integrator

The Status Dashboard allows you to monitor the metrics of a stand-alone Streaming Integrator instance or a Streaming Integrator cluster. This involves monitoring whether all processes of the Streaming Integrator setup are working in a healthy manner, monitoring the current status of a Streaming Integrator node, and viewing metrics relating to the history of a node or the cluster. Both JVM level metrics or Siddhi application level metrics can be viewed from the Status Dashboard.

The following sections cover how to configure the Status Dashboard and analyze statistics relating to your Streaming Integrator deployment in it.

System requirements

This use case involves running both the Streaming Integrator and the Analytics Dashboard at the same time. The system requirements are as follows:

For the Streaming Integrator:

Memory

  • ~ 2 GB per streaming integrator node (and therefore, 4 GB for the recommended Minimum HA cluster
  • 2 CPU cores minimum. It is recommended to allocate 4 cores.
  • ~ 2 GB is the initial heap (-Xms) required for the server startup. The maximum heap size is 4 GB (-Xmx)

Disk

  • ~ 480 MB, excluding space allocated for log files and databases.
  • For the Analytics Dashboard:

    Memory

    • ~ 2 GB minimum, 4 GB Maximum
    • 2 CPU cores minimum. It is recommended to allocate 4 cores.
    • ~ 512 MB heap size. This is generally sufficient to process typical SOAP messages but the requirements vary with larger message sizes and the number of messages processed concurrently.

    Disk

  • ~ 480 MB, excluding space allocated for log files and databases.
  • Configuring the Status Dashboard

    The following sections cover the configurations that need to be done in order to view statistics relating to the performance of your Streaming Integrator deployment in the Status Dashboard.

    Before you begin"

    Assigning unique carbon IDs to nodes

    Carbon metrics uses the carbon ID as the source ID for metrics. Therefore, all the worker nodes are required to have a unique carbon ID defined in the wso2.carbon: section of the <SI_HOME>/conf/server/deployment.yaml file as shown in the extract below.

    Info

    You need to ensure that the carbon ID of each node is unique because it is required for the Status dashboard to identify the worker nodes and display their statistics accordingly.

        wso2.carbon:
            # value to uniquely identify a server
          id: wso2-si-1
            # server name
          name: WSO2 Streaming Integrator
            # server type
          type: wso2-si
            # ports used by this server
          ports:
              # port offset
            offset: 0

    Setting up the database

    To monitor statistics in the Status Dashboard, you need a shared metrics database that stores the metrics of all the nodes.

    Set up a database of the required type by following the steps below. In this section, a MySQL database is created as an example.

    Info

    The Status Dashboard is only supported with H2, MySQL, MSSQL and Oracle database types. It is configured with the H2 database type by default. If you want to continue to use H2, skip this step.

    1. Download and install the required database type. For this example, let's download and install MySQL Server.

    2. Download the required database driver. For this example, download the MySQL JDBC driver.

    3. Unzip the database driver you downloaded, copy its JAR file (mysql-connector-java-x.x.xx-bin.jar in this example), and place it in the <DASHBOARD_HOME>/lib directory.

    4. Enter the following command in a terminal/command window, where username is the username you want to use to access the databases.

      mysql -u username -p

    5. When prompted, specify the password you are using to access the databases with the username you specified.

    6. Create two databases named WSO2_METRICS_DB (to store metrics data) and WSO2_STATUS_DASHBOARD_DB (to store statistics) with tables. To create MySQL databases and tables for this example, run the following commands.

          mysql> create database WSO2_METRICS_DB;
          mysql> use WSO2_METRICS_DB;
          mysql> source <DASHBOARD_HOME>/wso2/monitor/dbscripts/metrics/mysql.sql;
          mysql> grant all privileges on WSO2_METRICS_DB.* TO 'username'@'localhost';

      Tip

      • The syntax of the MySQL commands depend on the MySQL version. The given systax is for MySQL 8x versions. Check the syntax for the version you are using when performing this step.
      • Replace with the path to your .
      • Replace 'username'@'localhost' with your username and host name (e.g., 'root'@'localhost')
    7. Create two datasources named WSO2_METRICS_DB and WSO2_STATUS_DASHBOARD_DB by adding the following datasource configurations under the wso2.datasources: section of the <DASHBOARD_HOME>/conf/monitor/deployment.yaml file.

      Info

      The names of the data sources must be the same as the names of the database tables you created for metrics and statistics. You need to change the values for the username and password parameters to the username and password that you are using to access the MySQL database.

      For detailed information about datasources, see carbon-datasources.

      • WSO2_METRICS_DB

           - name: WSO2_METRICS_DB
              description: The datasource used for dashboard feature
              jndiConfig:
                name: jdbc/WSO2MetricsDB
              definition:
                type: RDBMS
                configuration:
                  jdbcUrl: 'jdbc:mysql://localhost:3306/WSO2_METRICS_DB?allowPublicKeyRetrieval=true&useSSL=false'
                  username: root
                  password: root
                  driverClassName: com.mysql.jdbc.Driver
                  maxPoolSize: 50
                  idleTimeout: 60000
                  connectionTestQuery: SELECT 1
                  validationTimeout: 30000
                  isAutoCommit: false
      • WSO2_STATUS_DASHBOARD_DB

            - name: WSO2_STATUS_DASHBOARD_DB
              description: The datasource used for dashboard feature
              jndiConfig:
                name: jdbc/wso2_status_dashboard
                useJndiReference: true
              definition:
                type: RDBMS
                configuration:
                  jdbcUrl: 'jdbc:mysql://localhost:3306/WSO2_STATUS_DASHBOARD_DB?allowPublicKeyRetrieval=true&useSSL=false'
                  username: root
                  password: root
                  driverClassName: com.mysql.jdbc.Driver
                  maxPoolSize: 50
                  idleTimeout: 60000
                  connectionTestQuery: SELECT 1
                  validationTimeout: 30000
                  isAutoCommit: false

      The following are sample configurations for database tables when you use other database types supported.

      Click here to view the sample data source configurations.

      Database Type Metrics Datasource Dashboard Datasource
      MSSQL
      name: WSO2_METRICS_DB
        description: The datasource used for dashboard feature
        jndiConfig:
       
                     name: jdbc/WSO2MetricsDB
        definition:
       
                     type: RDBMS
          configuration:
       
                     jdbcUrl: 
                    'jdbc:sqlserver://localhost;databaseName=wso2_metrics'
       
                     
                    username: root
            password: root
            driverClassName: com.microsoft.sqlserver.jdbc.SQLServerDriver
            maxPoolSize: 50
            idleTimeout: 60000
            connectionTestQuery: SELECT 1
            validationTimeout: 30000
            isAutoCommit: false
      name: WSO2_STATUS_DASHBOARD_DB
        description: The datasource used for dashboard feature
        jndiConfig:
       
                     name: jdbc/wso2_status_dashboard
          useJndiReference: true
        definition:
       
                     type: RDBMS
          configuration:
       
                     jdbcUrl: 
                    'jdbc:sqlserver://localhost;databaseName=monitoring'
       
                     
                    username: root
            password: root
            driverClassName: com.microsoft.sqlserver.jdbc.SQLServerDriver
            maxPoolSize: 50
            idleTimeout: 60000
            connectionTestQuery: SELECT 1
            validationTimeout: 30000
            isAutoCommit: false
      Oracle
      name: WSO2_METRICS_DB
        description: The datasource used for dashboard feature
        jndiConfig:
       
                     name: jdbc/WSO2MetricsDB
        definition:
       
                     type: RDBMS
          configuration:
       
                     jdbcUrl: 
                    'jdbc:oracle:thin:@localhost:1521/xe'
       
                     
                    username: root
            password: root
            driverClassName: oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver
            maxPoolSize: 50
            idleTimeout: 60000
            connectionTestQuery: SELECT 1
            validationTimeout: 30000
            isAutoCommit: false
      name: WSO2_STATUS_DASHBOARD_DB
        description: The datasource used for dashboard feature
        jndiConfig:
       
                     name: jdbc/wso2_status_dashboard
          useJndiReference: true
        definition:
       
                     type: RDBMS
          configuration:
       
                     jdbcUrl: 
                    'jdbc:oracle:thin:@localhost:1521/xe'
       
                     
                    username: root
            password: root
            driverClassName: oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver
            maxPoolSize: 50
            idleTimeout: 60000
            connectionTestQuery: SELECT 1
            validationTimeout: 30000
            isAutoCommit: false

    Configuring metrics

    This section explains how to configure metrics for your status dashboard.

    Configuring worker metrics

    To enable metrics and to configure metric-related properties, do the following configurations in the <SI_HOME>/conf/server/deployment.yaml file for the required SI nodes.

    1. To enable Carbon metrics, set the enabled property to true under wso2.metrics as shown below.

              wso2.metrics:
                enabled: true
    2. To enable JDBC reporting, set the Enable JDBC parameter to true in the wso2.metrics.jdbc: -> reporting: subsection as shown below. If JDBC reporting is not enabled, only real-time metrics are displayed in the first page of the Status dashboard, and information relating to metrics history is not displayed in the other pages of the dashboard. To render the first entry of the graph, you need to wait for the time duration specified as the pollingPeriod.

              # Enable JDBC Reporter
               name: JDBC
               enabled: true
               pollingPeriod: 60
    3. Under wso2.metrics.jdbc , configure the following properties to clean up the database entries.

              wso2.metrics.jdbc:
                # Data Source Configurations for JDBC Reporters
                dataSource:
                  # Default Data Source Configuration
                  - &JDBC01
                    # JNDI name of the data source to be used by the JDBC Reporter.
                    # This data source should be defined in a *-datasources.xml file in conf/datasources directory.
                    dataSourceName: java:comp/env/jdbc/WSO2MetricsDB
                    # Schedule regular deletion of metrics data older than a set number of days.
                    # It is recommended that you enable this job to ensure your metrics tables do not get extremely large.
                    # Deleting data older than seven days should be sufficient.
                    scheduledCleanup:
                      # Enable scheduled cleanup to delete Metrics data in the database.
                      enabled: false
      
                      # The scheduled job will cleanup all data older than the specified days
                      daysToKeep: 7
      
                      # This is the period for each cleanup operation in seconds.
                      scheduledCleanupPeriod: 86400

      Parameter Default Value Description
      dataSource &JDBC01
      dataSource > dataSourceName java:comp/env/jdbc/WSO2MetricsDB The name of the datasource used to store metric data.
      dataSource > scheduledCleanup > enabled false If this is set to true , metrics data stored in the database is cleared at a specific time interval as scheduled.
      dataSource > scheduledCleanup > daysToKeep 3 If scheduled clean-up of metric data is enabled, all metric data in the database that are older than the number of days specified in this parameter are deleted.
      dataSource > scheduledCleanup > scheduledCleanupPeriod 86400 This parameter specifies the time interval in seconds at which all metric data stored in the database must be cleared.

    4. JVM metrics of which the log level is set to OFF are not measured by default. If you need to monitor one or more of them, add the relevant metric name(s) under the wso2.metrics: -> levels subsection as shown in the extract below. As shown below, you also need to mention log4j mode in which the metrics need to be monitored (i.e., OFF , INFO, DEBUG, TRACE, or ALL).

              wso2.metrics:
               # Enable Metrics
                 enabled: true
                  jmx:
                    # Register MBean when initializing Metrics
                  registerMBean: true
                    # MBean Name
                  name: org.wso2.carbon:type=Metrics
                  # Metrics Levels are organized from most specific to least:
                  # OFF (most specific, no metrics)
                  # INFO
                  # DEBUG
                  # TRACE (least specific, a lot of data)
                  # ALL (least specific, all data)
               levels:
                    # The root level configured for Metrics
                  rootLevel: INFO
                    # Metric Levels
                  levels:
                       jvm.buffers: 'OFF'
                       jvm.class-loading: INFO
                       jvm.gc: DEBUG
                       jvm.memory: INFO
      Click here to view the default metric levels supported...
      • Class loading
      Property
      • Garbage collector
      Property
      • Memory
      Property
      • Operating system load
      Property
      • Threads
      | Property                          | Default Level | Description                                                                                                                                                                                                     |
      |-----------------------------------|---------------|-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
      | `jvm.threads.count`               | `Debug`       | The gauge for showing the number of active and idle threads currently available in the JVM thread pool.                                                                                                         |
      | `jvm.threads.daemon.count`        | `Debug`       | The gauge for showing the number of active daemon threads currently available in the JVM thread pool.                                                                                                           |
      | `jvm.threads.blocked.count`       | `OFF`         | The gauge for showing the number of threads that are currently blocked in the JVM thread pool.                                                                                                                  |
      | `jvm.threads.deadlock.count`      | `OFF`         | The gauge for showing the number of threads that are currently deadlocked in the JVM thread pool.                                                                                                               |
      | `jvm.threads.new.count`           | `OFF`         | The gauge for showing the number of new threads generated in the JVM thread pool.                                                                                                                               |
      | `jvm.threads.runnable.count`      | `OFF`         | The gauge for showing the number of runnable threads currently available in the JVM thread pool.                                                                                                                |
      | `jvm.threads.terminated.count`    | `OFF`         | The gauge for showing the number of threads terminated from the JVM thread pool since user started running the WSO2 API Manager instance.                                                                       |
      | `jvm.threads.timed_waiting.count` | `OFF`         | The gauge for showing the number of threads in the Timed\_Waiting state.                                                                                                                                        |
      | `jvm.threads.waiting.count`       | `OFF`         | The gauge for showing the number of threads in the Waiting state in the JVM thread pool. One or more other threads are required to perform certain actions before these threads can proceed with their actions. |
      • File descriptor details
      Property
      • Swap space
      Property

    Configuring Siddhi application metrics

    To enable Siddhi application level metrics for a Siddhi application, you need to add the @app:statistics annotation below the Siddhi application name in the Siddhi file as shown in the example below.

        @App:name('TestMetrics')
        @app:statistics(reporter = 'jdbc')
        define stream TestStream (message string);

    The following are the metrics measured for a Siddhi application.

    Info

    The default level after enabling metrics is INFO for all the metrics listed in the following table.

    Metric Components to which the metric is applied
    Latency
    • Windows (per window.find and window.add)
    • Mappers (per sink mapper, source mapper)
    • Queries (per query)
    • Tables (per table insert, find, update, updateOrInsert, delete, contains)
    Throughput
    • Windows (per window.find and window.add)
    • Mappers (per sink mapper, source mapper)
    • Queries (per query)
    • Tables (per table insert, find, update, updateOrInsert, delete, contains )
    Memory Queries (per query)
    Buffered Events Count
    Number of events at disruptor Streams (per stream)
    Number of events produced/received after restart
    • Sources (per source)
    • Sinks (per sink)

    Configuring cluster credentials

    In order to access the nodes in a cluster and derive statistics, you need to maintain and share a user name and a password for each node in a SI cluster. This user name and password must be specified in the <DASHBOARD_HOME>/conf/monitor/deployment.yaml file. If you want to secure sensitive information such as the user name and the password, you can encrypt them via WSO2 Secure Vault.

    1. To specify the user name and the password to access a node, define them under the wso2.status.dashboard section as shown in the following example.

          wso2.status.dashboard:
            pollingInterval: 5
            metricsDatasourceName: 'WSO2_METRICS_DB'
            dashboardDatasourceName: 'WSO2_STATUS_DASHBOARD_DB'
            workerAccessCredentials:
              username: 'admin'
              password: 'admin'
    2. To encrypt the user name and the password you defined, define aliases for them as described in Protecting Sensitive Data via the Secure Vault.

      Info

      This functionality is currently supported only for single tenant environments.

    Configuring permissions

    The following are the three levels of permissions that can be granted for the users of the Status Dashboard.

    Permission Level Granted permissions
    SysAdmin
    • Enabling/disabling metrics
    • Adding workers
    • Deleting workers
    • Viewing workers
    Developers
    • Adding workers
    • Deleting workers
    • Viewing workers
    Viewers Viewing workers

    The admin user in the user store is assigned the SysAdmin permission level by default.

    To assign different permission levels to different roles, you can list the required roles under the relevant permission level in the wso2.status.dashboard section of the <DASHBOARD_HOME>/conf/monitor/deployment.yaml file as shown in the extract below.

        wso2.status.dashboard:
          sysAdminRoles:
            - role_1
          developerRoles:
            - role_2
          viewerRoles:
            - role_3

    Info

    The display name of the roles given in the configuration must be present in the user store. To configure user store check, User Management.

    Accessing the Status Dashboard

    To access the Status Dashboard, follow the procedure below:

    1. In the terminal, navigate to the <DASHBOARD_HOME>/bin directory and issue the relevant command to start the dashboard profile based on your operating system.

      • For Windows: monitor.bat
      • For Linux : ./monitor.sh
    2. Access the Status Dashboard via the following URL format.

      `https://localhost:/monitoring

      e.g., https://0.0.0.0:9648/monitoring

    3. Sign in by entering admin as both the user name and the password.

    After signing in, this opens the Status Dashboard with the nodes that you have already added as shown in the example below.

    Status Dashboard Overview

    If no nodes are displayed, add the nodes for which you wnt to view statistics by following the steps in Adding a node to the dashboard.

    Node overview

    Once you login to the status dashboard, the nodes that are already added to the Status Dashboard are displayed as shown in the following example:

    Adding a node to the dashboard

    If no nodes are displayed, you can add the nodes for which you want to view the status by following the procedure below:

    1. Click ADD NEW NODE.

      Add New Node

      This opens the following dialog box.

      Add New Node dialog box

    2. Enter the following information in the dialog box and click ADD NODE to add a gadget for the required node in the Node Overview page.

      1. In the Host parameter, enter the host ID of the node you want to add.

      2. In the Port parameter, enter the port number of the node you want to add.

    3. If the node you added is currently unreachable, the following dialog box is displayed.

      Unreachable Node

      Click either WORKER or MANAGER. If you click WORKER, the node is displayed under Never Reached. If you click Manager , the node is displayed under Distributed Deployments as shown below.

      Unreachable nodes

    Info

    The following basic details are displayed for each node.

    • CPU Usage : The CPU resources consumed by the Streaming Integrator node out of the available CPU resources in the machine in which it is deployed is expressed as a percentage.
    • Memory Usage : The memory consumed by the node as a percentage of the total memory available in the system.
    • Load Average :
    • Siddhi Apps : The total number of Siddhi applications deployed in the node.

    Viewing status details

    The following is a list of sections displayed in the Node Overview page to provide information relating to the status of the nodes.

    Distributed Deployments

    View (Example)

    Description

    The nodes that are connected in the distributed deployment are displayed under the relevant group ID in the status dashboard (e.g., sp in the above example). Both managers and workers are displayed under separate labels.

    Managers : The active manager node in the cluster is indicated by a green dot that is displayed with the host name and the port of the node. Similarly, a grey dot is displayed for passive manager nodes in the cluster.

    Workers : When you add an active manager node, it automatically retrieves the worker node details that are connected with that particular deployment. If the worker node is already registered in the Status Dashboard, you can view the metrics of that node as follows:

    Purpose
    • To determine whether the request load is efficiently allocated between the nodes of a cluster.
    • To determine whether the cluster has sufficient resources to handle the load of requests.
    • To identify the nodes connected with the particular deployment.
    Recommended Action
    • If there is a disparity in the CPU usage and the memory consumption of the nodes, redeploy the Siddhi applications between the nodes to balance out the workload.
    • If the CPU and memory are fully used and and the request load is increasing, allocate more resources (e.g., more memory, more nodes, etc.).

    Clustered nodes

    View (Example)

    Description

    The nodes that are clustered together in a high-availability deployment are displayed under the relevant cluster ID in the Status Dashboard (e.g., under WSO2_A_1 in the above example). The active node in the cluster (i.e., the active worker in a minimum HA cluster or the active manager in a fully distributed cluster) are indicated by a green dot that is displayed with the hostname and the port of the node. Similarly, a grey dot is displayed for passive nodes in the cluster.

    Purpose

    This allows you to determine the following:

    • Whether the request load is efficiently allocated between the nodes of a cluster.
    • Whether the cluster has sufficient resources to handle the load of requests.
    Recommended Action
    • If there is a disparity in the CPU usage and the memory consumption of the nodes, redeploy the Siddhi applications between the nodes to balance out the workload.
    • If the CPU and memory are fully used and and the request load is increasing, allocate more resources (e.g., more memory, more nodes, etc.).

    Single nodes

    View (Example)

    Description This section displays statistics for Streaming Integrator servers that operate as single node setups.
    Purpose This allows you to compare the performance of single nodes agaisnt each other.
    Recommended Action
    • If the CPU usage of a node is too high, investigate the causes for it and take corrective action (e.g., undeploy unnecessary Siddhi applications).
    • If any underutilized single nodes are identified, you can either deploy more Siddhi applications thatare currrently deployed in other nodes with a high request load. Alternatively, you can redeploy the Siddhi applications of the underutilized node to other nodes, and then shut it down.

    Nodes that cannot be reached

    View (Example)

    Description When a node is newly added to the Status dashboard and it is unavailable, it is displayed as shown in the above examples.
    Purpose This allows you to identify nodes that cannot be reached at specific hosts and ports.
    Recommended Action
    • Check whether the host and port of the node you added is correct.
    • Check whether any authentication errors have occured for the node.

    Nodes that are currently unavailable

    View (Example)

    Description When a node that could be viewed previously is no longer available, its status is displayed in red as shown in the example above. The status displayed for such nodes is applicable for the last time at which the node had been reachable.
    Purpose This allows you to identify previously available nodes that have become unreachable.
    Recommended Action
    • Check whether the node is inactive.
    • Check whether any authentication errors have occured for the node.

    Nodes for which metrics is disabled

    View (Example)

    Description When a node for which metrics is disabled is added to the Status dashboard, you can view the number of active and inactive Siddhi applications deployed in it. However, you cannot view the CPU usage, memory usage and the load average.
    Purpose This allows you to identify nodes for which metrics is not enabled.
    Recommended Action Enable metrics for the required nodes to view statistics about their status in the Status Dashboard. For instructions to enable metrics, see Monitoring the Stream Processor - Configuring the Status Dashboard .

    Nodes with JMX reporting disabled

    View (Example)

    Description When a node with JMX reporting disabled is added to the Status dashboard, you can view the number of active and inactive Siddhi applications deployed in it. However, you cannot view the CPU usage, memory usage and the load average.
    Purpose This allows you to identify nodes for which JMX reporting is disabled
    Recommended Action Enable JMX reporting for the required nodes to view statistics about their status in the Status Dashboard. For instructions to enable JMX reporting, see Monitoring the Stream Processor - Configuring the Status Dashboard .

    Statistics trends

    View (Example)

    Description This dispalys the change that has taken taken place in the CPU usage, memory usage and the load average of nodes since the status was last viewed in the status dashboard. Positive changes are indicated in green (e.g., a decrease in the CPU usage in the above example), and egative changes are indicated in red (an increase in the memory usage and the load average in the above example).
    Purpose This allows you to view a summary of the performance trends of your Streaming Integrator clusters and single nodes.
    Recommended Action Based on the performance trend observed, add more resources to your Streaming Integrator clusters/single nodes to handle more events, or shutdown one or more nodes if there is excess resources.

    Viewing node-specific pages

    When you open the Status Dashboard, the Node Overview page is displayed by default. To view information specific to a selected worker node, click on the relevant widget. This opens a separate page for the worker node as shown in the example below.

    Worker-specific Details

    Status indicators

    The following gadgets can be viewed for the selected worker.

    Server General Details

    View (Example)

    Description This gadget displays general information relating to the selected worker node.
    Purpose This allows you to understand the distribution of nodes in terms of the location, the time zone, operating system used etc., and to locate them.
    Recommended Action In a distributed set up, you can use this information to evaluate the clustered setup and make changes to optimize the benefits of deploying the Streaming Integrator as a cluster (e.g., making them physically available in different locations to minimize the risk of all the nodes failing at the same time etc.).

    CPU Usage

    View (Example)


    Description This displays the CPU usage of the selected node.
    Purpose This allows you to observe the CPU usage of a selected node over time.
    Recommended Action
    • Identify sudden slumps in the CPU usage, and investigate the reasons (e.g., such as authentication errors that result in requests not reaching the Streaming Integrator server).
    • Identify continuous increases in the CPU usage and check whether the node is overloaded. If so, reallocate some of the Siddhi applications deployed in the node.

    Memory Used

    View (Example)


    Description This displays the memory usage of the selected node.
    Purpose This allows you to observe the memory usage of a selected node over time.
    Recommended Action
    • Identify sudden slumps in the memory usage, and investigate the reasons (e.g., a reduction in the requests recived due to system failure).
    • If there are continous increases in the memory usage, check whether there is an increase in the requests handled, and whether you have enough memory resources to handle the increased demand. If not, add more memory to the node or reallocate some of the Siddhi applications deployed in the node to other nodes.

    System Load Average

    View (Example)


    Description This displays the system load average for the selected node.
    Purpose This allows you to observe the system load of the node over time.
    Recommended Action

    Observe the trends of the node's system load, and adjust the allocation of resources (e.g., memory) and work load (i.e., the number of Siddhi applications deployed) accordingly.

    Overall Throughput

    View (Example)


    Description This displays the overall throughput of the selected node.
    Purpose This allows you to assess the performance of the selected node in terms of the throughput over time.
    Recommended Action
    • Compare the throughput of the node against that of other nodes with the same amount of CPU and memory resources. If there are significant variations, investigate the causes (e.g., the differences in the number of requests received by different Siddhi applications deployed in the nodes).
    • Observe changes in the throughput over time. If there are significant variances, investigate the causes (e.g., whether the node has been unavaialable to receive requests during a given time).

    Siddhi Applications

    View (Example)


    Description

    This table displays the complete list of Siddhi applications deployed in the selected node. The status is displayed in green for active Siddhi applications, and in red for inactive Siddhi applications. In addition, the following is displayed for each Siddhi application:

    • Age : The age of the Siddhi application in milliseconds.
    • Latency : The time (in milliseconds) taken by the Siddhi application to process one request.
    • Throughput: The number of requests processed by the Siddhi application since it has been active.
    • Memory : The amount of memory consumed by the Siddhi application during its current active session, expressed in milliseconds.
    Purpose This allows you to assess the performance of each Siddhi application deployed in the selected node.
    Recommended Action
    • Identify the inactive Siddhi applications that are required to be active and take the appropriate corrective action.
    • Identify Siddhi applications that consume too much memory, and identify ways in which the memory usage can be optimized (e.g., use incremental processing).

    Viewing worker history

    This section explains how to view statistics relating to the performance of a selected node for a specific time interval.

    1. Log in to the Status Dashboard.

    2. In the Node Overview page, click on the required node to view information specific to that node.

    3. In the page displayed with node-specific information, click one of the following gadgets to open the Metrics page.

      • CPU Usage

      • Memory Used

      • System Load Average

      • Overall Throughput

    4. In the Metrics page, click the required time interval. Then the page displays statistics relating to the performance of the selected node applicable to that time period.

      Select Time Interval

    5. If you want to view more details, click More Details.

      More Details About Node Performance

      As a result, the following additional information is displayed for the node for the selected time period.

      • CPU Usage

        CPU Usage

      • JVM OS as CPU

        JVM OS as CPU

      • JVM Physical Memory

        JVM Physical Memory

      • JVM Threads

        JVM Threads

      • JVM Swap Space

        JVM Swap Space

    Viewing statistics for Siddhi applications

    When you open the WSO2 Status Dashboard, the Node Overview page is displayed by default.

    1. To view information specific to a selected worker node, click on the relevant gadget. This opens the page specific to the worker.

    2. To view information specific to a Siddhi application deployed in the Siddhi node, click on the relevant Siddhi application in the Siddhi Applications table. This opens a page with information specific to the selected Siddhi application as shown in the example below.

      Siddhi Application Statistics

    The following statistics can be viewed for an individual Siddhi Application.

    Latency

    View (Example)

    Description This displays the latency of the selected Siddhi application. Latency is the time taken to complete processing a single event in the event flow.
    Purpose This allows you to assess the performance of the selected Siddhi application.
    Recommended Action If the latency of the Siddhi application is too high, check the Siddhi queries and rewrite them to optimise performance.

    Overall Throughput

    View (Example)

    Description This shows the overall throughput of a selected Siddhi application over time.
    Purpose This allows you to assess the performance of the selected Siddhi application.
    Recommended Action
    • If the throughput of a Siddhi application varies greatly overtime, investigate reasons for any slumps in the throughput (e.g., errors in the deployment of the application).
    • If the throughput of the Siddhi application is lower than expected, investigate reasons, and take corrective action to improve the throughput (e.g., check the Siddhi queries in the application and rewrite them with best practices to achieve greater efficiency in the processing of events.

    Memory Used

    View (Example)

    Description This displays the memory usage (In MB) of a selected Siddhi application over time.
    Purpose This allows you to monitor the memory consumption of individual Siddhi applications.
    Recommended Action

    If there are major fluctuations in the memory consumption of a Siddhi application, investigate the reasons (e.g., Whether the Siddhi application has been inactive at any point of time).

    Code View

    View (Example)

    Description This displays the queries defined in the Siddhi file of the application.
    Purpose This allows you to check the queries of the Siddhi application if any further investigations are needed based on the observations of its latency, throughput and the memory consumption.
    Recommended Action

    Edit the Siddhi file if any changes that can improve the performance of the Siddhi application are identified.
    For detailed instructions to write a Siddhi application, see Creating a Siddhi Application.
    For detailed information about the Siddhi logic, see the Siddhi Query Guide.


    Design View

    View (Example)

    Description This displays the graphical view for queries defined in the Siddhi file of the application.
    Purpose This allows you to check the flow of the queries of the Siddhi application in the graphical way.
    Recommended Action Edit the Siddhi file if any changes that can improve the performance of the Siddhi application are identified.

    Siddhi App Component Statistics

    View (Example)

    Description

    This table displays performance statistics related to dfferent components within a selected Siddhi application (e.g., queries). The columns displayed are as follows:

    • Type : The type of the Siddhi application component to which the information displayed in the row applies. The component type can be queries, streams, tables, windows and aggregations. For more information, see Siddhi Application Overview - Common components of a Siddhi application .
    • Name : The name of the Siddhi component within the application to which the information displayed in the row apply.
    • Metric Type : The metric type for which the statistics are displayed. This can be either the latency (in milliseconds), throughput the number of events per second), or the amount of memory consumed (in bytes). The metric types based on which the performance of a Siddhi component is measured depends on the component type.
    • Attribute : The attribute to which the given value applies.
    • Value : The value for the metric type given in the row.
    Purpose This allows you to carry out a detailed analysis of the performance of a selected Siddhi application and identify components that have a negative impact on the overall performance of the Siddhi application.
    Recommended Action Identify the componets in a Siddhi application that have a negative impact on the performance, and rewrite them to improve performance. To understand Siddhi concepts in order to rewrite the components, see the Siddhi Query Guide .

    Viewing statistics for parent Siddhi applications

    When you open the WSO2 Status Dashboard, the Node Overview page is displayed by default. To view information specific to an active manager, click on the required active manager node in the Distributed Deployments section. This opens a page with parent Siddhi applications deployed in that manager node as shown in the example below.

    Parent Siddhi Applications

    This page provides a summary of information relating to each parent Siddhi application as described in the table below. If a parent Siddhi application is active, it is indicated with a green dot that appears before the name of the Siddhi application. Similarly, an orange dot is displayed for inactive parent Siddhi applications.

    Detail Description
    Groups This indicates the number of execution groups of the parent Siddhi application. In the above example, the Testing Siddhi application has only one execution group.
    Child Apps This indicates the number of child applications of the parent Siddhi application. The number of active child applications is displayed in green, and the number of inactive child applications are displayed in red.
    Worker Nodes

    The number displayed in yellow indicates the total number of worker nodes in the resource cluster. In the above example, there are two worker nodes in the cluster.

    The number displayed in green indicates the number of worker nodes in which the Siddhi application is deployed. In the above example, the Testing parent Siddhi application is deployed only in one worker node although there are two worker nodes in the resource cluster.

    If you click on a parent Siddhi application, detailed information is displayed as shown below.

    Parent Siddhi Application Details

    The following are the widgets displayed.

    Code View

    View (Example)

    Description

    This displays the queries defined in the Parent Siddhi file of the application.

    This allows you to check the queries of the Siddhi application if any further investigations are needed based on the kafka diagrams and performance.
    For detailed instructions to write a Siddhi application, see Converting to a Distributed Streaming Application .

    For detailed information about the Siddhi logic, see the Siddhi Query Guide .

    Purpose This allows you to check the queries of the Siddhi application if any further investigations are needed based on the observations of the performance of the distributed cluster to which it belongs.
    Recommended Action

    Edit the Siddhi file if any changes that can improve the performance of the Siddhi application are identified.
    For detailed instructions to write a Siddhi application, see Converting to a Distributed Streaming Application .
    For detailed information about the Siddhi logic, see the Siddhi Query Guide .

    Distributed Siddhi App Deployment

    View (Example)

    Description This is a graphical representation of how Kafka topics are connected to the child Siddhi applications of the selected parent Siddhi application. Kafka topics are represented by boxes with red margins, and the child applications are represented by boxes with blue margins.
    Purpose This is displayed for you to understand how the flow of information takes place.

    Child App Details

    View (Example)

    Description

    This table displays the complete list of child Siddhi applications of the selected parent Siddhi application. The status is displayed in green for active Siddhi applications, and in red for inactive Siddhi applications. In addition, the following is displayed for each Siddhi application:

    • Group Name : The name of the execution group to which the child application belongs.
    • Child App Status : This indicates whether the child application is currently active or not.
    • Worker Node : The HTTPS host and The HTTPS port of the worker node in which the child siddhi application is deployed.
    Purpose To identify the currently active child applications.

    Application overview

    When you open the WSO2 Status Dashboard, the Node Overview page is displayed by default. If you want to view all the Siddhi applications deployed in your Streaming Integrator setup, click on the App View tab (marked in the image below). The App Overview tab opens and all the Siddhi applications that are currently deployed are displayed as shown in the image below.

    Application Overview

    The status is displayed in green for active Siddhi applications, and in red for inactive Siddhi applications.

    If no Siddhi applications are deployed in your Streaming Integrator setup, the following message is displayed.

    No Siddhi Applications Deployed

    The Siddhi applications are listed under the deployment mode in which they are deployed (i.e., Single Node Deployment, HA Deployment, and Scalable Deployment).

    The following information is displayed for each Siddhi application.

    • Siddhi Application: The name of the Siddhi application.

    • Status: This indicates whether the Siddhi application is currently active or inactive.

    • Deployed Time: The time duration that has elapsed since the Siddhi application was deployed in the Streaming Integrator setup.

    • Deployed Node: The host and the port of the Streaming Integrator node in which the Siddhi application is displayed.

    The purpose of this tab is to check the status of all the Siddhi applications that are currently deployed in the Streaming Integrator setup.

    If you click on a Siddhi Application under Single Node Deployment or HA Deployment, information specific to that Siddhi application is displayed as explained in Viewing Statistics for Siddhi Applications.

    If you click on the parent Siddhi application under Distributed Deployment, information specific to that parent Siddhi application is displayed as explained in Viewing Statistics for Parent Siddhi Applications.

    If you click on a deployed node, information specific to that node is displayed as explained in Viewing Node-specific Pages.

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